Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

HR Can Take the Lead in Creating a Safe Workplace for All. Share Your Voice.

It’s a movement being experienced globally. Unprecedented numbers of individuals have come forward in 2017 with serious allegations of sexual harassment and assault. While the issue is systemic through every employment system worldwide, high-profile victims that have spoken out have created an environment where many others feel comfortable to share their voice.

The curtain is being pulled back as more and more allegations surface. Time Magazine even named the “silence-breakers” that have come forward as “Person of the Year.”

As this revolution of speaking out is occurring, leaders in organizations of every kind have an opportunity to be change agents; to create new and/or improved policies to create a positive and safe environment. With any great movement, these changes are being influenced by many, many voices and we’d like to hear yours. The world is listening.

Waggl’s latest Voice of the Workplace research, in collaboration with NCHRA, invites you to share your thoughts on what HR can do about sexual harassment in the workplace.

If you’re interested in learning how to cultivate a culture of trust, transparency, and inclusion in your workplace, contact Waggl to learn more.

9 thoughts on “Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

  1. The first thing that needs to happen is to stop treating this as an “HR Issue” and enlist leaders at every level in the problem solving effort. The pervasiveness of the abuse of power and its impact make it clear that our solution must be as systemic as the behavior itself. There needs to be a safe way to report abuse, a responsibility to act the moment it gets reported, and a culture that communicates on a daily basis that it won’t be accommodated or tolerated.

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